Worry

Worry

The normal worries of everyday life are usually easy to control or 'switch off'. Worrying can be constructive if it helps you to work out possible solutions to a problem. However, some people are troubled by excessive worry and anxiety that seems difficult to control.
This type of excessive worrying is known as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Worries associated with GAD are distressing, last a long time and may appear for no apparent reason. GAD is characterised by a feeling of apprehension and constant, irrational worrying about potential threats to yourself and loved ones. This can include feeling anxious about a variety of minor issues that are unlikely to occur.
You might worry about health, finances, family issues and work or study performance, even when there is no cause for alarm. Some estimates suggest that around three per cent of Australians have generalised anxiety disorder. GAD may occur following a stressful life event or a period of high stress. It is more likely to develop if a person is predisposed to high anxiety by a combination of genetic factors and environmental influences. There are various self-help strategies you can use to reduce your tendency to worry. Other options include seeking professional treatment.
Symptoms
People with generalised anxiety disorder experience several mental, emotional and physical symptoms, including:
* Excessive and unreasonable worry over events or activities, such as work, school or health
* Excessive worry about their capacity and confidence to deal with situations
* Inability to control or stop their worrying
* Feelings of apprehension
* Muscle tension and restlessness
* Feeling keyed-up or on edge
* Fatigue
* Tension headaches
* Problems with concentration
* Irritability
* Sleeping problems, such as insomnia.

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